Introduction

Welcome to the Carbon Lab (CLab).

The CLab is part of the Department of Physics of the University of Rome Tor Vergata.

Professor Maurizio De Crescenzi is the head of the group.

The main CLab research areas combine synthesis, characterization and device assembly. In particular, we are working on the growth and study of carbon-based materials such as, carbon nanotubes, carbon aerogels, silicon carbide,  and also metallic nanodots for coatings, solar cells, silicon nanotubes and brand new applications.

Our research activity has been focused on the investigation of the structural and electronic properties of surfaces both clean and interacting with chemisorbed species, and of metal/semiconductor interfaces by means of spectroscopic techniques such as Auger, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection and Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM).

We contributed actively to the development of some electron spectroscopic techniques such as local surface structural tool, as the Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure (EELFS) and the Extended Fine Auger Structure (EXFAS). We also investigated the growth of nanostructures of Ge/Si and Fe/Cu/Si ultra-thin films through Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) processes.

Recently we have synthesized carbon nanotubes and other materials, such as silicon reconstructed surfaces, and they have been shown through STM and Atom Force Microscopy (AFM).
We also pursue the synthesis, purification and characterization of carbon nanotube films, devising innovative ways to probe their structure and tailor it to obtain improved mechanical, optical and electronic properties.

Our experimental work is paralleled by first principles calculations and modelling; thus we have a comprehensive approach to nanotechnology: we can design and build new materials, characterize them, implement them into devices and investigate their fundamental properties.

The successful application of nanomaterials for nanotechnology faces four main challenges: materials preparation, characterization, device fabrication and integration. The physical properties of nanomaterials strongly depend on their atomic-scale structure, size and chemistry but also on their organisation and aggregation. To fully exploit the technological advantages offered by these self-assembled structures it is essential to acquire the ability to select, control and manipulate individual or aggregated nanomaterials.
There has been much progress in the synthesis and characterization of nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanocrystals, nanowires, organic and biological nanostructures, molecular junctions and graphene layers. However, immense challenges remain in understanding their properties and interactions with external probes to realize their great potential for applications. Some of the frontiers in nanoscience include spintronics, nanoscaled opto-electronic devices, nanomechanics, light-harvesting and emitting nanostructures. Nanotubes, nanowires and graphene dominate the pursuit for materials for future nanotechnology applications.

The CLab aims to give a significant contribution in each of these exciting research areas.

Actual Members

Former Members

Dr. Luca Camilli
Dr. Silvano Del Gobbo
Dr. Silvia Masala
Dr. Linda Riele
Dr. Claudia Scilletta
Dr. Francesca Tombolini

Microscopy

Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM).

Spectroscopy

Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS).

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS).

Low-Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED).

Material Processing

Thermal evaporator in ultra high vacuum for metal (Au, Ag, Cu, Fe) and semiconducting (Ge) nanoparticles deposition.

Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD).

Solar Cells Optoelectronic Characterization

Keathley 2600A System SourceMeter.

LOT Solar simulator AM1.5 (Xe lamp) for Photo-Conversion Efficiency (PCE) measurements.

Monochromator for External Quantum Efficiency (EQE) measurements.

Carbon Nanotubes

Carbon nanotubes are the one-dimensional allotropic form of carbon obtained from one or more graphite planes called grafene rolled up in a particular direction. Carbon nanotubes with only one shell are called single-walled otherwise multi-walled. Their diameter ranges from one nanometre to tens and their size can reach up to centimetres, thus they can be considered a one-dimensional structure due to their large aspect ratio.

Depending on their wrapping direction, carbon nanotubes can exhibit metallic or semiconducting chirality with an electronic band gap up to several electronvolts.

Furthermore, carbon nanotubes are the strongest and stiffest materials yet discovered in terms of tensile strength and elastic modulus respectively.

Moreover, they are a strong absorber/emitter material in the near ultraviolet, visible and near infra-red range. Interestingly, also metallic carbon nanotubes have optical transitions.

In addition carbon nanotubes are expected to be very good thermal conductors along the tube, but good insulators laterally to the tube axis.

Owing to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal conductivity and electrical properties, carbon nanotubes find applications as additives to various structural materials.

Carbon Nanotube Third Generation Solar Cells

Carbon nanotube/silicon solar cells are very promising with photo-conversion efficiencies up to 15%. In these cells, a semi-transparent carbon nanotube film is deposited at room temperature on a n-doped silicon wafer, thus giving rise to an overall reduction of the total silicon thickness and to the fabrication of a low-cost, stable and lightweight device at low-temperature. In particular, the semiconducting carbon nanotube film acts as a charge carrier layer. Moreover, under particular conditions, also carbon nanotubes are an efficient photon absorber, which extends the conventional silicon cell external quantum efficiency towards the near ultraviolet and the near infra-red regions.

Furthermore, carbon nanotube/amorphous silicon solar cells have been also investigated. Amorphous silicon thin films are normally deposited at relatively low-temperature on glass substrates or plastics, which are coated with a transparent conducting oxide. Up to now the maximum power conversion efficiency achieved with amorphous silicon solar cells is about 10%. The amorphous nature of silicon has several important consequences for photovoltaics. In this regard, we have found that carbon nanotubes give promising results.

Carbon Nanotube Aerogels

Owing to their excellent electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been exploited as building blocks in several nanoscale devices. These properties make carbon nanotubes particularly suitable for strain sensor applications. Carbon nanotube aerogels are free-standing three-dimensional carbon nanotube networks, realized by a chemical vapour deposition technique. This macro-structure is made of random entangled carbon nanotubes several millimetres long forming a porous sponge-like structure. The dependence of electrical conductivity upon compression of aerogels has been investigated. The conductivity linearly scales with the applied compressive loads and in particular increases up to 600%. This behaviour is due to increase of contacts among neighbouring carbon nanotubes under loads, that is highlighted by in situ scanning electron microscopy analysis. The network sustains compressions up to 75% and elastically recovers its morphology and conductivity during the release period. The improved mechanical properties coupled with the chemical stability makes aerogels interesting for pressure-sensing applications.

Furthermore, carbon nanotube aerogels, owing to their large specific area and chemical properties, are considered excellent candidates for waste-water clean-up. We have demonstrated that aerogels selectively uptake from water a mass of toxic organic solvent (i.e. dichlorobenzene) higher than that absorbed by individual carbon nanotubes. In addition, owing to the presence of highly defective nanostructures constituting them, our samples exhibit a super-hydrophobic character enabling an efficient separation from water of oil contaminants.

Super-hydrophobic Carbon Nanostructured Materials

The wettability of solid surfaces with water in particular, is an important property in a variety of natural and technological processes with several industrial applications. This phenomenon is governed by the chemical composition and the geometrical structure of the surfaces. Since the chemical composition is an intrinsic property of materials, wettability is usually enhanced by the increase of surface roughness (three-dimensional micro- and nano-geometry), especially by fractal structures. An interest in wetting of rough surfaces was strengthened due to a super-hydrophobicity phenomenon observed under investigation of natural (plant leaves, insect legs and bird feathers) and artificial objects. The natural explanation for super-hydrophobicity when apparent contact angles become close to 180° is provided by the Cassie-Baxter model. According to this model, air can remain trapped below the drop, forming air pockets. Thus hydrophobicity is strengthened because the drop sits partially on the air. Recently, wettability of carbon nanotubes is of great interest, and we have measured contact angles up to 157° and contact angle hysteresis as low as 5°.

Decoration of Carbon Nanotubes  with Metallic Nanoparticles

A recent interest has risen from the controlled deposition of metal, alloy, metal oxide and semiconducting compound nanoparticles on the carbon nanotube surface. These nanoparticle hybrid systems have emerged as new class of nanomaterial whose magnetic, electronic, optical and catalytic properties differing deeply from those of the bulk material and mainly depending on their size and shape. Several methods of controlled deposition and immobilization of nanoparticles along the carbon nanotubes can promote either covalent linking using organic- or bio-molecules, or a non-covalent linking through electrostatic interactions, chemical reduction, electro-deposition. The direct deposition of the metal nanoparticles can be obtained from evaporation of noble and transition metals on carbon nanotube films. Following this way nanoparticles form on the carbon nanotube walls and their adhesion is guaranteed by strong enough van der Waals interactions. During the deposition process the carbon nanotubes can simply act as supporting substrate or as template tailoring the final nanoparticles size. A variety of metals commonly used in catalytic reactions (Pt, Au, Ag, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ni and Cu) have been employed on single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.  In case of covalent methods, it is necessary to chemically modify the carbon nanotube surface to make it an active substrate for linker molecules. The nature and size of the linkers involved can be tuned so as to influence either energy or charge transfer between carbon nanotubes and the nanocrystals.

Nanoparticle/single-walled carbon nanotubes composites have been employed in light-energy conversion devices as the photo-active layers on the electrodes of photochemical devices and electrochemical cells.

Self-Assembled Monolayers

Supra-molecular species have been synthesized with the purpose of obtaining materials with interesting and useful properties. Different molecules can be assembled together by intermolecular interactions to give supra-molecular entities, in analogy to biological systems which self-associate in a particular pattern by building blocks to form a higher order organized complex. The key advantage of using self-assembly is that it capitalizes on the formation of non-covalent and reversible interactions, including electrostatic, hydrophobic, van der Waals and metal-ligand interactions, hydrogen bonds, and aromatic n-stacking. Collectively, if in sufficient number, these weak interactions can yield highly stable assemblies.
In general, the ability to form tightly packed surfaces depends on the length of the peptides and their three-dimensional structure. Usually, short peptides populate several conformations, they are very flexible and rapidly inter-converting between the different conformers. Mainly for this reason, they form loosely packed films that show a large degree of inhomogeneity and have up to 15% vacant sites. By contrast, longer helical peptides form well ordered and densely packed films. The capability to form a tightly packed self-assembled monolayers depends not only on the length of the peptide primary structure, but also on the type of secondary structure attained by the peptide chains and on the presence of aromatic groups in the molecules. We have recently demonstrated that also very short peptides feature very good self-assembly properties if they are folded in a helical conformation, and that these properties can be remarkably improved if they are functionalized with properly arranged aromatic chromophores. Thus, peptides are good candidates as building blocks for the construction of self-assembled nanostructures.

Synthesis and Investigation of Clean Surfaces

Silicon carbide is a wide band gap semiconductor characterized by high breakdown voltage, large electron mobility, great thermal conductivity, considerable chemical inertness and good hardness. Therefore, silicon carbide has attracted great interest for the technological applications that require the production of devices able to work in extreme conditions. Though few silicon carbide-based devices are available today, the main issues of the silicon carbide technology are the large cost for wafer production and the poor quality for electronic applications. Moreover, another interesting challenge is to fabricate silicon carbide devices integrated with the silicon technology.  In the last decade several routes have been explored to obtain high quality cubic silicon carbide films on silicon substrates in terms of good silicon carbide/silicon interface, low density of voids and lattice defects. All these limitations are mainly connected with the high growth temperatures, the different thermal expansion coefficient, the large lattice mismatch between silicon carbide and silicon and the large silicon out-diffusion from the substrate. In order to bridge the lattice mismatch and prevent silicon out-diffusion, an appropriate interfacial buffer layer, obtained through the so-called carbonisation methods is required before growing silicon carbide thick films. Carbonisation methods use reactions between carbon precursors and the silicon surface to directly provide on it, cubic silicon carbide layers with the same orientation of the Si-substrate. Substrate temperature and carbon amount during the carbonisation process have been found to be responsible of two competitive silicon supply mechanisms, namely silicon out-diffusion from the substrate and silicon diffusion from uncovered surface areas. Therefore, temperature and carbon amount are important parameters determining the film morphology, silicon voids in the silicon substrate and stoichiometric silicon carbide formation.

Silicon Nanotubes

In the last decade, one-dimensional nanostructured materials have received a considerable interest because of their promising electronic, optical and opto-electronic properties for nanotechnological applications. In this scenario, silicon is particularly relevant due to the eminence of silicon-based device in modern microelectronics. Silicon nanoclusters and nanowires have been extensively investigated both experimentally and theoretically. On the other hand, the formation of silicon fullerene and nanotubular structures is not favoured due to the tendency of silicon to make sp3 rather than sp2 bonds. Silicon hybridization is one of the most intriguing topics addressed by a variety of theoretical studies exploring the stability, the structure and the electronic properties of silicon nanotubes. The existence of sp2 hybridized silicon atoms or of a tubular structure constituted by sp3 hybridized atoms is of paramount importance for fundamental physics. To date, few silicon nanotubular structures have been fabricated and characterized. Very recently, we have reported the successful synthesis of mostly non-oxidised silicon nanotubes by gas phase condensation technique. The resulting silicon nanotubes have a large diameter greater than 50 nm, a huge crystalline wall thickness of 4–6 nm and are embedded in non-stoichiometric silicon oxide layers or are filled with amorphous silica.

2013

C. Pintossi, G. Salvinelli, G. Drera, S. Pagliara, L. Sangaletti, S. Del Gobbo, M. Morbidoni, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, Direct Evidence of Chemically Inhomogeneous, Nanostructured, Si-O Buried Interfaces and Their Effect on the Efficiency of Carbon Nanotube/Si Photovoltaic Heterojunctions, Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Nanomaterials and interface 117, 18688-18696 (2013)

L. Camilli, C. Pisani, M. Passacantando, V. Grossi, M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, Maurizio De Crescenzi, Pressure-dependent electrical conductivity of freestanding three-dimensional carbon nanotube network, Applied Physics Letters 102, 183117 (2013)

L. Camilli, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, E. Gautron, S. Lefrant, M. De Crescenzi, Probing the structure of Fe nanoparticles in multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a stainless steel substrate, Journal of Nanoparticle Research 15, 1846-4 (2013)

C. Aramo, A. Ambrosio, M. Ambrosio, R. Battiston, P. Castrucci, M. Cilmo, M. De Crescenzi, E. Fiandrini, V. Grossi, F. Guarino, P. Maddalena, E. Nappi, M. Passacantando, G. Pignatel, S. Santucci, M. Scarselli, A. Tinti, A. Valentini, Progress on the development of a silicon-carbon nanotube photodetector, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research, Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment 518, 554-556 (2013)

S. Del Gobbo, P. Castrucci, S. Fedele, L. Riele, A. Convertino, M. Morbidoni, F. De Nicola, M. Scarselli, L. Camilli and M. De Crescenzi, Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells, Journal of Materials Chemistry C 1, 6752-6758 (2013)

2012

M. Scarselli, L. Camilli, L. Matthes, O. Pulci, P. Castrucci, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, M. De Crescenzi, Photoresponse from noble metal nanoparticles-multi walled carbon nanotube composites, Applied Physics Letters 101, 241113 (2012)

L. Camilli, M. Scarselli, S. Del Gobbo, F. R. Lamastra, F. Nanni, E. Gautron, S. Lefrant, F. D'Orazio, F. Lucari, M. De Crescenzi, High coercivity of iron-filled carbon nanotubes synthesized on austenitic stainless steel, Carbon 50, 718-721 (2012)

E. Gatto, A. Porchetta, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, F. Formaggio, C. Toniolo, M. Venanzi, Playing with Peptides: How to Build a Supramolecular Peptide Nanostructure by Exploiting Helix center dot center dot center dot Helix Macrodipole Interactions, Langmuir 28, 2817-2826 (2012)

M. Scarselli, L. Camilli, P. Castrucci, F. Nanni, S. Del Gobbo, E. Gautron, S. Lefrant, M. De Crescenzi, In situ formation of noble metal nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and its implication in metal-nanotube interactions, Carbon 50, 875-884 (2012)

P. De Padova, B. Olivieri, J. M. Mariot, L. Favre, I. Berbezier, C. Quaresima, B. Paci, A. Generosi, V. R. Albertini, A. Cricenti, C. Ottaviani, M. Luce, A. M. Testa, D. Peddis, D. Fiorani, Ferromagnetic Mn-doped Si0.3Ge0.7 nanodots self-assembled on Si(100), Journal of Physics 24, 142203 (2012)

L. Camilli, M. Scarselli, S. Del Gobbo, P. Castrucci, E. Gautron, M. De Crescenzi, Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel, Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology 3, 360-367 (2012)

V. Le Borgne, L. A. Gautier, P. Castrucci, S. Del Gobbo, M. De Crescenzi, M. A. E. Khakani, Enhanced UV photoresponse of KrF-laser-synthesized single-wall carbon nanotubes/n- silicon hybrid photovoltaic devices, Nanotechnology 23, 215206 (2012)

S. Scarselli, L .Camilli, L. Persichetti, P. Castrucci, S. Lefrant, E. Gautron, M. De Crescenzi, Strain analysis of noble metal islands grown on multiwalled carbon nanotubes, Carbon 50, 3616-3621 (2012)

P. Castrucci, M. Diociaiuti, C. M. Tank, S. Casciardi, F. Tombolini, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, V. L. Mathe, S. V. Bhoraskar, Si nanotubes and nanospheres with two-dimensional polycrystalline walls, Nanoscale 4, 5195-5201 (2012)

C. Aramo, M. Ambrosio, R. Battiston, P. Castrucci, M. Cilmo, M. De Crescenzi, E. Fiandrini, F.Guarino, V. Grossi, E. Nappi, M. Passacantando, G. Pignatel, S. Santucci, M. Scarselli, A. Tinti, A. Valentini, A. Ambrosio, Innovative carbon nanotube-silicon large area photodetector, Journal of Instrumentation 7, 8013 (2012)

M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, Electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices based on carbon nanotubes, Journal of Physics 24, 313202 (36) (2012)

C. Aramo, A. Ambrosio, M. Ambrosio, P. Castrucci, M. Cilmo, M. De Crescenzi, E. Fiandrini, F. Guarino, V. Grossi, E. Nappi, M. Passacantando, G. Pignatel, S. Santucci, M. Scarselli, A. Tinti, A. Valentini, Progress in the realization of a silicon-CNT photodetector, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment 695, 150-153 (2012)

2011

L. Camilli, M. Scarselli, S. Del Gobbo, P. Castrucci, F. Nanni, E. Gautron, S. Lefrant, M. De Crscenzi, The synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition using a stainless steel catalyst, Carbon 49, 3307-3315 (2011)

M. Giulianini, E. R. Waclawik, J. M. Bell, M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, N. Motta, Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes, E-Polymers 3, 1433-1446 (2011)

P. Castrucci, C. Scilletta, S. Del Gobbo, M. Scarselli, L. Camilli, M. Simeoni, B. Delley, A. Continenza, M. De Crescenzi, Light harvesting with multiwall carbon nanotube/silicon heterojunctions, Nanotechnology 22, 115701-115707 (2011)

M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, L. Camilli, S.Del Gobbo, S. Casciardi, F. Tombolini, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, M. De Crescenzi, Influence of Cu nanoparticle size on the photo-electrochemical response from Cu–multiwall carbon nanotube composites, Nanotechnology 22, 035701-035708 (2011)

M. Giulianini, E. R. Waclawik, J. M. Bell, M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. Diociauti, S. Casciardi, N. Motta, Evidence of Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Deformation Caused by Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Adhesion, Journal of Physical Chemistry C Nanomaterials and Interfaces 115, 6324-6330 (2011)

A. Tinti, F. Righetti, T. Ligonzo, A. Valentini, E. Nappi, A. Ambrosio, M. Ambrosio, C. Aramo, P. Maddalena, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, E. Fiandrini, V. Grossi, S. Santucci, M. Passacantando, Electrical analysis of carbon nanostructures/silicon heterojunctions designed for radiation detection, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment 629, 377-381 (2011)

S. Del Gobbo, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, L. Camilli, M. De Crescenzi, L. Mariucci, A. Valletta, A. Minotti, and G. Fortunato, Carbon nanotube semitransparent electrodes for amorphous silicon based photovoltaic devices, Applied Physics Letters 98, 183113-183115 (2011)

2010

P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, M. A. El Khakani, F. Rosei, Probing the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes by nanoscale spectroscopy, Nanoscale 2, 1611-16254 (2010)

P. Castrucci, S. Del Gobbo, E. Speiser, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, G. Amiard, A. Ronda, I. Berbezier, Photoresponse induced by Ge nanodots on SiO2/Si substrate, Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 356, 1940-1942 (2010)

V. Le Borgne, P. Castrucci, S. Del Gobbo, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, M. Mohamedi, M. A. El Khakani, Enhanced photocurrent generation from UV-laser-synthesized-single-wall-carbon-nanotubes/n-silicon hybrid planar devices, Applied Physics Letters 97, 193105-193107 (2010)

A. Capasso, E. Waclawik, J. M. Bell, S. Ruffell, A. Sgarlata, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, N. Motta, Carbon nanotube synthesis from germanium nanoparticles on patterned substrates, Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids 356, 1972-1975 (2010)

2009

M. Giulianini, E. R. Waclawik, J. M. Bell, M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, N. Motta, Regioregular poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) helical self-organization on carbon nanotubes, Applied Physics Letters 95, 013304-013306 (2009)

M. Giulianini, E. R. Waclawik, J. M. Bell, M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, N. Motta, Poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) coil-wrapped single wall carbon nanotube investigated by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, Applied Physics Letters 95, 143116-143118 (2009)

M. Scarselli, C. Scilletta, F. Tombolini, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, S. Casciardi, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, Photon harvesting with multiwall carbon nanotubes, Superlattices and Microstructures 46, 340-346 (2009)

M. A. El Khakani, V. Le Borgne, B. Aïssa, F. Rosei, C. Scilletta, E. Speiser, M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, Photocurrent generation in random networks of multiwall-carbon nanotubes grown by an "all-laser" process, Applied Physics Letters 95, 083114-083116, 0003-6951 (2009)

M. Scarselli, C. Scilletta, F. Tombolini, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, S. Casciardi, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, Multi-wall carbon nanotubes decorated with copper nanoparticles: effect on the photocurrent response, Journal of Physical Chemistry C Nanomaterials and Interfaces 113, 5860-5864 (2009)

P. Castrucci, F. Tombolini, M. Scarselli, C. Scilletta, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, S. Casciardi, F. Rosei, M. A. El Khakani, Comparison of the local order in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite and bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes by nanoscale extended energy loss spectra, Journal of Physical Chemistry C Nanomaterials and Interfaces 113, 4848-4855 (2009)

2008

M. De Crescenzi, M. Scarselli, A. Sgarlata, S. Masala, P. Castrucci, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, A. Karmous, A. Ronda, P. D. Szkutnik, I. Berbezier, Photocurrent generation from Ge nanodots in the near UV and visible region, Superlattices and Microstructures 44, 331-336 (2008)

E. Perfetto, M. Cini, S. Ugenti, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, F. Rosei, M. A. El Khakani, Experimental and theoretical study of electronic correlations in carbon nanotubes and graphite from Auger spectroscopy, Journal of Physics, Conference Series 100, 052082 (2008)

2007

E. Perfetto, M. Cini, S. Ugenti, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, F. Rosei, M. A. El Khakani, Electronic correlations in graphite and carbon nanotubes from Auger spectroscopy, Physical Review B 76, 233408 (2007)

M. Scarselli, S. Masala, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, A. Karmous, P. D. Szkutnik, A. Ronda, I. Berbezier, Optoelectronic properties in quantum-confined germanium dots, Applied Physics Letters 91, 141117 (2007)

M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, D. Monti, M. De Crescenzi, Study of absorption of tetraphenynil porphyrin on graphite, Surface Science 601, 5526 (2007)

M. Scarselli, E. Ercolani, P. Castrucci, D. Monti, G. Bussetti, C. Goletti, P. Chiaradia, R. Paolesse, M. De Crescenzi, A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy investigation of tetraphenynilporphyrin deposited on graphite, Surface Science 601, 2607 (2007)

M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, F. Tombolini, M. Scarselli, E. Speiser, S. Del Gobbo, W. Richter, M. Diociaiuti, E. Gatto and M. Venanzi, Visible and near ultraviolet photocurrent generation in carbon nanotubes, Surface Science 601, 2810 (2007)

P. Castrucci, F. Tombolini, M. Scarselli, S. Bini, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, S. Casciardi, M. A. El Khakani, F. Rosei, Anharmonicity in single-wall carbon nanotubes as evidenced by means of extended energy loss fine structure spectroscopy analysis, Physical Review B 75, 035420 (2007)

2006

P. Castrucci, F. Tombolini, M. Scarselli, E. Speiser, S. Del Gobbo, W. Richter, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, E. Gatto, M. Venanzi, Large photocurrent generation in multiwall carbon nanotubes, Applied Physics Letters 89, 253107 (2006)

I. Berbezier, A. Karmous, P. D. Szkutnik, A. Ronda, A. Sgarlata, A. Balzarotti, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, Formation and ordering of Ge nanocrystals on SiO2 using FIB nanolithography, Materials Science in Semiconductor Processing 9, 812 (2006)

I. Berbezier, A. Karmous, A. Ronda, A. Sgarlata, A. Balzarotti, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, Growth of ultrahigh-density quantum confined germanium dots on SiO2 thin films, Applied Physics Letters 89, 063122 (2006)

G. Pace, M. Venanzi , P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, A. Palleschi, L. Stella, F. Formaggio, C. Toniolo, G. Marletta, Static and dynamic features of a helical hexapeptide chemisorbed on a gold surface, Materials Science and Engineering C 26, 918 (2006)

P. Castrucci , M. Scarselli , M. De Crescenzi , M. Diociaiuti , P. S. Chaudhari, C. Balasubramanian, T. M. Bhave , S. V. Bhoraskar, Silicon nanotubes: synthesis and characterization, Thin Solid Films 508, 226 (2006)

M. Venanzi, G. Pace, A. Palleschi, L. Stella, P. Castrucci, M.Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, F Formaggio, C.Toniolo, G. Marletta, Densely-packed self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces from a conformationally constrained helical hexapeptide, Surface Science 600, 409 (2006)

2005

A. Santoni, R. Frycek, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, XPS and STM study of SiC synthesized by acetylene and disilane reaction with the Si(100) 2x1 surface, Surface Science 582, 125 (2005)

P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, M. Diociaiuti, P. Chistolini, M. A. El Khakani, F. Rosei, Packing-induced electronic structure changes in bundled single-wall carbon nanotubes, Applied Physics Letters 87, 103106 (2005)

M. De Crescenzi, P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. Diociaiuti, P. S. Chaudari, C. Balasubramanian, T. M. Bhave, S. V. Bhoraskar, Experimental images of silicon nanotubes, Applied Physics Letters 86, 231901 (2005)

F. Ratto, F. Rosei, A. Locatelli, S. Cherifi, S. Fontana, S. Heun, P. D. Szkutnik, A. Sgarlata, M. De Crescenzi, N. Motta, Composition of Ge(Si) islands in the growth of Ge on Si(111) by x-ray spectromicroscopy, Journal of Applied Physics 97, 043516 (2005)

2004

P. Castrucci, N. Pinto, L. Morresi, R. Gunnella, R. Murri, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, Magnetic properties of thin MnGe films investigated by magnetic force microscopy, Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 272-276, 1541 (2004)

P. Castrucci, R. Gunnella, P. Candeloro, E. Di Fabrizio, M. Conti, G. Carlotti, G. Gubbiotti, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, Magnetic properties of rectangular permalloy prisms: a combined magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optic Kerr study, Surface Science 566-568, 291 (2004)

F. Ratto, F. Rosei, A. Locatelli, S. Cherifi, S. Fontana, S. Heun, D. Szkutnik, A. Sgarlata, M. De Crescenzi, N. Motta, Composition of GeSi islands in the growth of Ge on Si(111), Applied Physics Letters 84, 4526 (2004)

P. Castrucci, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, M. A. El Khakani, F. Rosei, N. Braidy, J. H. Yi, Effect of coiling on the electronic properties along single-wall carbon nanotubes, Applied Physics Letters 85, 3857 (2004)

C. A. Pignedoli, A. Catellani, P. Castrucci, A. Sgarlata, M. Scarselli, M. De Crescenzi, C. M. Bertoni, Carbon induced restructuring of the Si(111) surface, Physical Review 69, 113313 (2004)

M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, P. D. Szkutnik, A. Sgarlata, M. De Crescenzi, STM study of Si(111) 7x7 reconstructed surface carbonization induced by acetylene, Surface Science 559, 223 (2004)

C. Balasubramanian, S. Bellucci, P. Castrucci, M. De Crescenzi, S. V. Bhoraskar, Scanning tunneling microscopy observation of coiled aluminum nitride nanotubes, Chemical Physics Letters 383, 188 (2004)

M. Scarselli, P. Castrucci, M. N. Piancastelli, M. De Crescenzi, Effect of the silicon surface step on the acetylene reactionwith the Si(111)7x7 reconstructed surface, Surface Science 566-568, 155-159 (2004)

1996

M. De Crescenzi, M. N. Piancastelli, Electron scattering and related spectroscopies, World Scientific (1996)

Ph.D. positions are available every year. In order to achieve a Ph.D. it is necessary to partecipate to an open competition. Typically, the examination takes place in October while the deadline for application is usually in September.
For general informations please see this link.
Prospective candidates are invited to contact directly Prof. Maurizio De Crescenzi.

Ph.D. scholarships are provided from the following institutions:

Tor Vergata University of Rome

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)

Available Master Thesis

Study of photovoltaic properties of carbon nanotubes and silicon based third generation solar cells.

Purification and sorting of carbon nanotubes.

Investigation of hydrophobic properties of carbon-based nanostructures.

Structural, electronic and opto-electronic comprehension of carbon nanotubes and their interactions with polymers and metallic nanoparticles.

Carbon nanostructured aerogels and their applications.

For any questions contact directly Prof. Maurizio De Crescenzi.

National Partners

International Partners

Carbon Lab

University of Rome Tor Vergata

Department of Physics

Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1

00133 Rome, Italy

Phone: 0039 0672594532

Map

How to get here

Rome can be reached from most international and national destinations.
Most airlines are connected to Fiumicino Airport (FCO) Leonardo da Vinci.
On the other hand, low-cost airlines often arrive to Ciampino Airport (CIA).
Furthermore there are two main railway stations, Termini Station and Tiburtina Station.

From Fiumicino Airport (FCO) Leonardo da Vinci

Direct train "Leonardo Express" to Rome Termini Station. Departure every 30 minutes. Then, Subway (Metro) A line to Anagnina Subway Station and 500, 20, 46 bus lines.

From Ciampino Airport (CIA)

Cotral bus line to Anagnina Subway (Metro) Station then 500, 20, 46 bus lines.

By train

The timetable of italian railways can be found at Trenitalia website where online booking is possible.
Most italian and european destinations are connected to Rome by trains arriving at Termini Station. Few trains, including local trains from Fiumicino Airport, stop in Tiburtina Station which is connected to Termini Station by Subway (Metro).

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